• A tribe in Panama uses drones to protect their territory

    A tribe in Panama with strong roots in the rainforest is seeking a land title to secure their territory. And they’re protecting their borders with a surprising form of surveillance. Drones. According to the World Bank, there are around 42 million indigenous people in Latin America. That accounts for about eight percent of the population. While most of the indigenous may still carry on customs that preserve their ancient culture, not all are living in the past. One tribe in the rainforests of Panama who have been on a quest to obtain the legal rights to the land they have inhabited for generations, are embracing modern technology. They're using drones to help gather data that will help their case. Correspondent Harris Whitbeck gives us a bird’s eye view of their efforts from outside Pana...

    published: 23 Mar 2017
  • The Canal Zone - Then and Now - Part 1 of 5

    The Panama Canal Zone was an unincorporated territory of the United States, from 1903 to 1979, centered on the Panama Canal and surrounded by the Republic of Panama. The zone consisted of the canal and an area generally extending five miles on each side of the centerline, excluding Panama and Colon cities, which otherwise would have been partly within the limits of the Zone. When reservoirs were created, to assure a steady supply of water for the locks, those lakes were included within the Canal Zone. On February 26, 1904, the Isthmian Canal Commission was proclaimed. In it, the Republic of Panama granted to the United States in perpetuity the use, occupation, and control of a zone of land and land under water for the construction, maintenance, operation, sanitation and protection of the ...

    published: 03 Dec 2016
  • US Territories Panama Canal

    published: 19 Jan 2017
  • Naso people in Panama demand recognition of their territory

    In the mountains that separate Panama from Costa Rica live the Naso people. This indigenous community continues to be pushed aside as companies pressure the Panamanian government to let them exploit such fertile lands without regard for the people that have lived there since the beginning of time. TeleSUR http://multimedia.telesurtv.net/web/telesur/#!en/video/naso-people-in-panama-demand-recognition-of-their-territory

    published: 05 Nov 2014
  • The Panama Canal Documentary - How The Panama Canal Was Built - World Documentary

    The Panama Canal Documentary - How The Panama Canal Was Built - World Documentary The Panama Canal (Spanish: Canal de Panamá) is a 77.1-kilometre (48 mi) ship canal in Panama that attaches the Atlantic Sea (by means of the Caribbean Sea) to the Pacific Sea. The canal crosses the Isthmus of Panama and is a crucial avenue for worldwide maritime profession. There are locks at each end to raise ships up to Gatun Lake, an artificial lake produced to lower the quantity of excavation work required for the canal, 26 metres (85 ft) higher than sea level. The existing secures are 33.5 metres (110 feet) broad. A 3rd, broader lane of locks is presently incomplete and also is because of open up in 2016. France started deal with the canal in 1881, but needed to stop due to engineering problems as well a...

    published: 06 Dec 2016
  • Panama City Beach, 1970s part 1

    published: 27 Feb 2012
  • Seventh Wonder Of The Modern World - Panama Canal Documentary - National TV

    Seventh Wonder Of The Modern World - Panama Canal Documentary - National TV The Panama Canal (Spanish: Canal de Panamá) is a 77.1-kilometre (48 mi) ship canal in Panama that hooks up the Atlantic Ocean (using the Caribbean Sea) to the Pacific Ocean. The canal crosses the Isthmus of Panama and also is a crucial channel for international maritime field. There are locks at each end to raise ships around Gatun Lake, a synthetic lake produced to minimize the amount of excavation job required for the canal, 26 metres (85 feet) over sea level. The present locks are 33.5 metres (110 ft) broad. A 3rd, broader lane of locks is presently incomplete and also is due to open up in 2016. France began deal with the canal in 1881, however had to stop because of design issues and high mortality because of...

    published: 13 Aug 2015
  • Travel by cruise ship to Panama Canal (HD)

    Travel by cruise ship to Panama Canal , Visit Panama Canal, Panama Canal Tours, Panama Canal Vacation Travel Videos HD, World Travel Guide http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=World1Tube The Panama Canal is a 77.1-kilometre (48 mi) ship canal in Panama that connects the Atlantic Ocean (via the Caribbean Sea) to the Pacific Ocean. The canal cuts across the Isthmus of Panama and is a key conduit for international maritime trade. There are locks at each end to lift ships up to Gatun Lake, an artificial lake created to reduce the amount of excavation work required for the canal, 26 metres (85 ft) above sea level. The current locks are 33.5 metres (110 ft) wide. A third, wider lane of locks is currently under construction and is due to open in 2016. France began work on the can...

    published: 16 Oct 2014
  • Casco Viejo - Panama

    Insta for daily adventures: @photosbyusher Casco Viejo is the historic district of Panama city, and I was told not to go there. Before my first trip to Panama I read reviews saying it was gang territory and you probably shouldn't visit at night or without a tour guide... Well, times certainly have changed! Casco Viejo is the absolute hotspot for many of the best restaurants, shopping, sights and nightlife in Panama City. This UNESCO World Heritage site has grand old houses restored as condos, abandoned buildings turned into nightclubs and gang hangouts turned into luxury hotels. The history and the future of this place makes it an absolute highlight for any trip to Panama. Music: Venice Venture - Big Wild Massive thanks to the amazing people that helped me make this video! American T...

    published: 08 Mar 2017
  • Panama Canal Construction: "Through the Canal Bottom" 1912

    more at http://news.quickfound.net/intl/panama_news.html "Scenes of the Panama Canal under construction." Public domain film from the Library of Congress Prelinger Archive, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and equalization. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panama_Canal The Panama Canal (Spanish: Canal de Panamá) is an 82-kilometre (51 mi) ship canal in Panama that connects the Atlantic Ocean (via the Caribbean Sea) to the Pacific Ocean. The canal cuts across the Isthmus of Panama and is a key conduit for international maritime trade. Work on the canal, which began in 1880, was completed in 1914, making it no long...

    published: 26 Mar 2012
  • San Blas Carribean paradise islands in Panama I DJI Mavic Pro drone aerial video footage in 2.7k

    San Blas, Panama is an amazing Carribean paradise islands archipelago The video is shot with DJI Mavic Pro drone in 2.7k resolution. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ There are 378 islands within the archipelago and they are scattered around in an area of about 100 square miles. The majority of the 378 islands have no inhabitants, but on the larger ones you will find the gentle native people known as the Kuna’s. San Blas is an autonomous territory in Panama formally called Kuna Yala. As decent human beings we are constantly craving for something that we don't have and we are never fully happy with the present moment. Well, I have found a place where you I so little to be happy for just simple...

    published: 30 Mar 2017
  • Panama Canal Construction in 1912 | American Vintage Documentary

    ★ CHECK OUT OUR T-SHIRTS: https://bravestgeneration.com/collections/all ✚ Watch our "Old America" PLAYLIST: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLaGAbbh1M3ImKavW8ZY0aZyFK1c-PLCAj ►Facebook: https://facebook.com/TheBestFilmArchives ►Google+: https://plus.google.com/+TheBestFilmArchives ►Twitter: https://twitter.com/BestFilmArch Vintage documentary on the Panama Canal construction in 1912. Narration describes the construction of and history behind the Panama Canal. Footage primarily of trains, construction machinery and workers. Includes Gatun Dam. About the Canal: The Panama Canal (Spanish: Canal de Panamá) is a 48-mile (77 km) ship canal in Panama that connects the Atlantic Ocean (via the Caribbean Sea) to the Pacific Ocean. The canal cuts across the Isthmus of Panama and is a key con...

    published: 20 Mar 2016
  • DNA: Panama paper leaks expose hidden wealth of world's elite- Part II

    The two big draws that offshore entities in jurisdictions such as British Virgin Islands, Bahamas, Seychelles and more specifically Panama, offer are: secrecy of information relating to the ultimate beneficiary owner and zero tax on income generated. Zee News always stay ahead in bringing current affairs from all the valley of National interest, Politics, Entertainment, Sports and International happenings. We take you to the depth of every matter by providing every small detail and makes you familiar with all the happening around you. Zee News is the highly popular Hindi News channel of India’s largest television network ZMCL. The channel, which has a huge following in India and abroad, has won several prestigious national and international awards. Among its popular programs are - ...

    published: 04 Apr 2016
  • Panama Canal and Panama City

    The Panama Canal (Spanish: Canal de Panamá) is a 77.1-kilometre (48 mi) ship canal in Panama that connects the Atlantic Ocean (via the Caribbean Sea) to the Pacific Ocean. The canal cuts across the Isthmus of Panama and is a key conduit for international maritime trade. There are locks at each end to lift ships up to Gatun Lake, an artificial lake created to reduce the amount of excavation work required for the canal, 26 metres (85 ft) above sea level. The current locks are 33.5 metres (110 ft) wide. A third, wider lane of locks is currently under construction and is due to open in 2016. France began work on the canal in 1881, but had to stop because of engineering problems and high mortality due to disease. The United States took over the project in 1904, and took a decade to complete th...

    published: 02 Sep 2015
  • Panama/Panama Canal (One of the 7 wonders of the modern world) Part 7

    Welcome to my travelchannel.On my channel you can find almost 1000 films of more than 70 countries. See the playlist on my youtube channel.Enjoy! https://www.youtube.com/user/nurettinodunya/playlists Panama Canal The Panama Canal (Spanish: Canal de Panamá) is a 48-mile (77.1 km) ship canal in Panama that connects the Atlantic Ocean (via the Caribbean Sea) to the Pacific Ocean. The canal cuts across the Isthmus of Panama and is a key conduit for international maritime trade. There are locks at each end to lift ships up to Gatun Lake (85 feet (26 m) above sea-level). The Gatun Lake was used to reduce the amount of work required for a sea-level connection. The current locks are 110 feet (33.5 m) wide. A third, wider lane of locks is being built. Work on the canal, which began in 1881, was co...

    published: 29 Mar 2013
  • Panama Canal, Panama - Transit - Bridge of the Americas HD (2014)

    The Panama Canal (Spanish: Canal de Panamá) is a 77.1-kilometre (48 mi) ship canal in Panama that connects the Atlantic Ocean (via the Caribbean Sea) to the Pacific Ocean. The canal cuts across the Isthmus of Panama and is a key conduit for international maritime trade. There are locks at each end to lift ships up to Gatun Lake, an artificial lake created to reduce the amount of excavation work required for the canal, 26 metres (85 ft) above sea level. The current locks are 33.5 metres (110 ft) wide. A third, wider lane of locks is currently under construction and is due to open in 2015. France began work on the canal in 1881, but had to stop because of engineering problems and high mortality due to disease. The United States took over the project in 1904, and took a decade to complete th...

    published: 27 Jul 2014
A tribe in Panama uses drones to protect their territory

A tribe in Panama uses drones to protect their territory

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:42
  • Updated: 23 Mar 2017
  • views: 87
videos
A tribe in Panama with strong roots in the rainforest is seeking a land title to secure their territory. And they’re protecting their borders with a surprising form of surveillance. Drones. According to the World Bank, there are around 42 million indigenous people in Latin America. That accounts for about eight percent of the population. While most of the indigenous may still carry on customs that preserve their ancient culture, not all are living in the past. One tribe in the rainforests of Panama who have been on a quest to obtain the legal rights to the land they have inhabited for generations, are embracing modern technology. They're using drones to help gather data that will help their case. Correspondent Harris Whitbeck gives us a bird’s eye view of their efforts from outside Panama City.
https://wn.com/A_Tribe_In_Panama_Uses_Drones_To_Protect_Their_Territory
The Canal Zone - Then and Now - Part 1 of 5

The Canal Zone - Then and Now - Part 1 of 5

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:03
  • Updated: 03 Dec 2016
  • views: 265
videos
The Panama Canal Zone was an unincorporated territory of the United States, from 1903 to 1979, centered on the Panama Canal and surrounded by the Republic of Panama. The zone consisted of the canal and an area generally extending five miles on each side of the centerline, excluding Panama and Colon cities, which otherwise would have been partly within the limits of the Zone. When reservoirs were created, to assure a steady supply of water for the locks, those lakes were included within the Canal Zone. On February 26, 1904, the Isthmian Canal Commission was proclaimed. In it, the Republic of Panama granted to the United States in perpetuity the use, occupation, and control of a zone of land and land under water for the construction, maintenance, operation, sanitation and protection of the canal. From 1903 to 1979 the territory was controlled by the United States, which had built the canal and financed its construction. The Canal Zone was abolished on October 1, 1979, as a term of the Torrijos - Carter Treaties of 1977; the canal was under joint U.S. - Panamanian control from 1979 until it was fully turned over to Panamá on December 31, 1999.
https://wn.com/The_Canal_Zone_Then_And_Now_Part_1_Of_5
US Territories Panama Canal

US Territories Panama Canal

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:16
  • Updated: 19 Jan 2017
  • views: 13
videos
https://wn.com/US_Territories_Panama_Canal
Naso people in Panama demand recognition of their territory

Naso people in Panama demand recognition of their territory

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:34
  • Updated: 05 Nov 2014
  • views: 35
videos
In the mountains that separate Panama from Costa Rica live the Naso people. This indigenous community continues to be pushed aside as companies pressure the Panamanian government to let them exploit such fertile lands without regard for the people that have lived there since the beginning of time. TeleSUR http://multimedia.telesurtv.net/web/telesur/#!en/video/naso-people-in-panama-demand-recognition-of-their-territory
https://wn.com/Naso_People_In_Panama_Demand_Recognition_Of_Their_Territory
The Panama Canal Documentary - How The Panama Canal Was Built - World Documentary

The Panama Canal Documentary - How The Panama Canal Was Built - World Documentary

  • Order:
  • Duration: 44:04
  • Updated: 06 Dec 2016
  • views: 34
videos
The Panama Canal Documentary - How The Panama Canal Was Built - World Documentary The Panama Canal (Spanish: Canal de Panamá) is a 77.1-kilometre (48 mi) ship canal in Panama that attaches the Atlantic Sea (by means of the Caribbean Sea) to the Pacific Sea. The canal crosses the Isthmus of Panama and is a crucial avenue for worldwide maritime profession. There are locks at each end to raise ships up to Gatun Lake, an artificial lake produced to lower the quantity of excavation work required for the canal, 26 metres (85 ft) higher than sea level. The existing secures are 33.5 metres (110 feet) broad. A 3rd, broader lane of locks is presently incomplete and also is because of open up in 2016. France started deal with the canal in 1881, but needed to stop due to engineering problems as well as high mortality because of illness. The United States took control of the task in 1904, and also took a years to finish the canal, which was formally opened up on August 15, 1914. Among the largest and most difficult engineering jobs ever carried out, the Panama Canal shortcut considerably lowered the moment for ships to travel in between the Atlantic and also Pacific Oceans, allowing them to prevent the lengthy, harmful Cape Horn route around the most southern tip of South America using the Drake Passage or Strait of Magellan. The shorter, faster, and also more secure route to the U.S. West Coastline and also to countries around the Pacific Sea permitted those places to come to be more integrated with the world economic situation. During building, possession of the territory that the Panama Canal now passes through was first Colombian, after that French, and after that American. The United States continuouslied regulate the canal and also bordering Panama Canal Zone up until the 1977 Torrijos-- Carter Treaties offered handover to Panama. After a period of joint American-- Panamanian control, the canal was taken over by the Panamanian government in 1999, and is currently managed and also run by the Panama Canal Authority, a Panamanian government firm. Yearly website traffic has increased from around 1,000 ships in 1914, when the canal opened up, to 14,702 vessels in 2008, the last measuring a total of 309.6 million Panama Canal/Universal Size System (PC/UMS) tons. By 2008, more than 815,000 vessels had travelled through the canal; the biggest ships that could transportation the canal today are called Panamax. [1] It takes 6 to 8 hrs to travel through the Panama Canal. The American Society of Civil Designers has named the Panama Canal one of the seven marvels of the modern world. Be The First To Watch Our Newly Uploaded Videos Just By Subscribing To Our Channel http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCH8mO...
https://wn.com/The_Panama_Canal_Documentary_How_The_Panama_Canal_Was_Built_World_Documentary
Panama City Beach, 1970s part 1

Panama City Beach, 1970s part 1

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:05
  • Updated: 27 Feb 2012
  • views: 14675
videos
https://wn.com/Panama_City_Beach,_1970S_Part_1
Seventh Wonder Of The Modern World - Panama Canal Documentary - National TV

Seventh Wonder Of The Modern World - Panama Canal Documentary - National TV

  • Order:
  • Duration: 43:55
  • Updated: 13 Aug 2015
  • views: 4946
videos
Seventh Wonder Of The Modern World - Panama Canal Documentary - National TV The Panama Canal (Spanish: Canal de Panamá) is a 77.1-kilometre (48 mi) ship canal in Panama that hooks up the Atlantic Ocean (using the Caribbean Sea) to the Pacific Ocean. The canal crosses the Isthmus of Panama and also is a crucial channel for international maritime field. There are locks at each end to raise ships around Gatun Lake, a synthetic lake produced to minimize the amount of excavation job required for the canal, 26 metres (85 feet) over sea level. The present locks are 33.5 metres (110 ft) broad. A 3rd, broader lane of locks is presently incomplete and also is due to open up in 2016. France began deal with the canal in 1881, however had to stop because of design issues and high mortality because of illness. The United States took over the task in 1904, and also took a decade to finish the canal, which was formally opened on August 15, 1914. One of the biggest and also most difficult design tasks ever before taken on, the Panama Canal faster way significantly reduced the time for ships to take a trip in between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, enabling them to stay clear of the lengthy, harmful Cape Horn route around the most southern tip of South America by means of the Drake Passage or Strait of Magellan. The shorter, quicker, as well as more secure path to the U.S. West Shore and also to nations around the Pacific Sea permitted those locations to come to be more incorporated with the world economic climate. Throughout renovation, ownership of the territory that the Panama Canal currently passes through was first Colombian, then French, and then American. The US remained to manage the canal and also bordering Panama Canal Zone up until the 1977 Torrijos-- Carter Treaties offered handover to Panama. After a period of joint American-- Panamanian control, the canal was taken control of by the Panamanian federal government in 1999, and also is currently handled and also operated by the Panama Canal Authority, a Panamanian government company. Yearly website traffic has actually increased from around 1,000 ships in 1914, when the canal opened, to 14,702 vessels in 2008, the latter gauging a total of 309.6 million Panama Canal/Universal Measurement System loads. By 2008, greater than 815,000 vessels had gone through the canal; the largest ships that could transit the canal today are called Panamax. It takes 6 to 8 hrs to travel through the Panama Canal. The American Culture of Civil Designers has named the Panama Canal among the seven marvels of the modern world. More Documentary Films: http://thetrendstoday.com Be The First To Watch Our Newly Uploaded Films Just By Subscribing To Our Channel http://www.youtube.com/channel/UChMjlytMi_zXY-RFlUzfBZQ?sub_confirmation=1
https://wn.com/Seventh_Wonder_Of_The_Modern_World_Panama_Canal_Documentary_National_Tv
Travel by cruise ship to Panama Canal (HD)

Travel by cruise ship to Panama Canal (HD)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 9:07
  • Updated: 16 Oct 2014
  • views: 2009612
videos
Travel by cruise ship to Panama Canal , Visit Panama Canal, Panama Canal Tours, Panama Canal Vacation Travel Videos HD, World Travel Guide http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=World1Tube The Panama Canal is a 77.1-kilometre (48 mi) ship canal in Panama that connects the Atlantic Ocean (via the Caribbean Sea) to the Pacific Ocean. The canal cuts across the Isthmus of Panama and is a key conduit for international maritime trade. There are locks at each end to lift ships up to Gatun Lake, an artificial lake created to reduce the amount of excavation work required for the canal, 26 metres (85 ft) above sea level. The current locks are 33.5 metres (110 ft) wide. A third, wider lane of locks is currently under construction and is due to open in 2016. France began work on the canal in 1881, but had to stop because of engineering problems and high mortality due to disease. The United States took over the project in 1904, and took a decade to complete the canal, which was officially opened on August 15, 1914. One of the largest and most difficult engineering projects ever undertaken, the Panama Canal shortcut greatly reduced the time for ships to travel between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, enabling them to avoid the lengthy, hazardous Cape Horn route around the southernmost tip of South America via the Drake Passage or Strait of Magellan. The shorter, faster, and safer route to the U.S. West Coast and to nations in and around the Pacific Ocean allowed those places to become more integrated with the world economy. It takes between 20 and 30 hours to traverse the canal. During construction, ownership of the territory that is now the Panama Canal was first Colombian, then French, and then American. The US continued to control the canal and surrounding Panama Canal Zone until the 1977 Torrijos–Carter Treaties provided for handover to Panama. After a period of joint American–Panamanian control, the canal was taken over by the Panamanian government in 1999, and is now managed and operated by the Panama Canal Authority, a Panamanian government agency. Annual traffic has risen from about 1,000 ships in 1914, when the canal opened, to 14,702 vessels in 2008, the latter measuring a total of 309.6 million Panama Canal/Universal Measurement System (PC/UMS) tons. By 2008, more than 815,000 vessels had passed through the canal; the largest ships that can transit the canal today are called Panamax. The American Society of Civil Engineers has named the Panama Canal one of the seven wonders of the modern world.
https://wn.com/Travel_By_Cruise_Ship_To_Panama_Canal_(Hd)
Casco Viejo - Panama

Casco Viejo - Panama

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:49
  • Updated: 08 Mar 2017
  • views: 191
videos
Insta for daily adventures: @photosbyusher Casco Viejo is the historic district of Panama city, and I was told not to go there. Before my first trip to Panama I read reviews saying it was gang territory and you probably shouldn't visit at night or without a tour guide... Well, times certainly have changed! Casco Viejo is the absolute hotspot for many of the best restaurants, shopping, sights and nightlife in Panama City. This UNESCO World Heritage site has grand old houses restored as condos, abandoned buildings turned into nightclubs and gang hangouts turned into luxury hotels. The history and the future of this place makes it an absolute highlight for any trip to Panama. Music: Venice Venture - Big Wild Massive thanks to the amazing people that helped me make this video! American Trade Hotel​ Tantalo Hotel Kitchen RooftopLUST Panama​ Caliope​ Alejandro GarridoPérez Shot on: Sony A7s, Canon 1DX Mark II Canon 24-105 f4 Canon 70-200 f2.8 Canon 17-40 f4
https://wn.com/Casco_Viejo_Panama
Panama Canal Construction: "Through the Canal Bottom" 1912

Panama Canal Construction: "Through the Canal Bottom" 1912

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:19
  • Updated: 26 Mar 2012
  • views: 43591
videos
more at http://news.quickfound.net/intl/panama_news.html "Scenes of the Panama Canal under construction." Public domain film from the Library of Congress Prelinger Archive, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and equalization. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panama_Canal The Panama Canal (Spanish: Canal de Panamá) is an 82-kilometre (51 mi) ship canal in Panama that connects the Atlantic Ocean (via the Caribbean Sea) to the Pacific Ocean. The canal cuts across the Isthmus of Panama and is a key conduit for international maritime trade. Work on the canal, which began in 1880, was completed in 1914, making it no longer necessary for ships to sail the lengthy Cape Horn route around the southernmost tip of South America and to navigate the dangerous waters of the Strait of Magellan. One of the largest and most difficult engineering projects ever undertaken, the Panama Canal shortcut made it possible for ships to travel between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans in half the time previously required. The shorter, faster, safer route to the U.S. West Coast and to nations in and along the Pacific Ocean allowed those places to become more integrated with the world economy. Ownership of the territory that is now the Panama Canal was first Colombian, then French and then American before coming under the control of the Panamanian government in 1999. The Panama Canal has seen annual traffic rise from about 1,000 ships when it opened in 1914, to 14,702 vessels in 2008... By 2008, more than 815,000 vessels had passed through the canal, many of them much larger than the original planners could have envisioned; the largest ships that can transit the canal today are called Panamax. The American Society of Civil Engineers has named the Panama Canal one of the seven wonders of the modern world... In 1904, the United States, under President Theodore Roosevelt, bought the French equipment and excavations for US$40 million, paid the new country of Panama US$10 million plus more each year, and began work on the Panama Canal on May 4, 1904. (In 1921, the United States paid Colombia US$10 million, plus US$250,000 per annum for several years; and in return Colombia recognized Panama under the terms of the Thomson-Urrutia Treaty)... Chief Engineer John Frank Stevens envisioned this work as essentially a massive earth-moving project requiring using a new and expanded Panama Railway as efficiently as possible. Stevens previous work as Chief Engineer of the Northern Pacific Railroad where they had built several 1,000 miles (1,600 km) of track had prepared Stevens well for this task. Much of the excavated material was used to build part of the Gatun Dam and the new elevated railroad required to get across Gatun Lake... The railroads, steam shovels, enormous steam-powered cranes, giant hydraulic rock crushers, cement mixers, dredges, and pneumatic power drills used to drill holes for explosives (about 30,000,000 pounds (14,000,000 kg) were used) were some of the new (in 1906) pieces of construction equipment used to construct the canal. Nearly all this equipment was manufactured by new, extensive machine-building technology developed and built in the United States. The giant hydraulic rock crushers supplied by the Joshua Hendy Iron Works were used to grind up rock needed for the cement work and quicken the pace of construction and large Ellicott Dredges of Baltimore, Maryland speeded up some of the various dredging projects. The first Ellicott Dredge delivered was a steam-driven, 900 hp (670 kW), 20-inch suction dredge used to help dig canal channels and fill Gatun Dam with dredged up slurry. In 1941, Ellicott Dredges also built the dredge MINDI, a 10,000 hp (7,500 kW), 28-inch cutter suction dredge still operating in the Panama Canal. Arch rivals General Electric and Westinghouse provided much of the electrical controls, motors, generators etc. The Panama Canal project had one of the largest and most extensive electrical installations in the world early in the 1900s. They use over 1000 electric motors with an installed capacity of about 28,000 horsepower to control their locks, valves, etc. from a central location In addition, the canal used large refrigeration systems for making ice. The Panama Canal Locks used essentially no pumps but relied on giant electrical valves and gates to control the flow of water from Lake Gatun into and out of the locks through water tunnels the size of railroad tunnels... The U.S. spent almost $375,000,000 (roughly equivalent to $8,600,000,000 now), including $12,000,000 to build facilities used to guard the canal, to finish the project. This was, by far, the largest American engineering project of that or any previous era.The canal was formally opened on August 15, 1914 with the passage of the cargo ship SS Ancon...
https://wn.com/Panama_Canal_Construction_Through_The_Canal_Bottom_1912
San Blas Carribean paradise islands in Panama I DJI Mavic Pro drone aerial video footage in 2.7k

San Blas Carribean paradise islands in Panama I DJI Mavic Pro drone aerial video footage in 2.7k

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:00
  • Updated: 30 Mar 2017
  • views: 267
videos
San Blas, Panama is an amazing Carribean paradise islands archipelago The video is shot with DJI Mavic Pro drone in 2.7k resolution. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ There are 378 islands within the archipelago and they are scattered around in an area of about 100 square miles. The majority of the 378 islands have no inhabitants, but on the larger ones you will find the gentle native people known as the Kuna’s. San Blas is an autonomous territory in Panama formally called Kuna Yala. As decent human beings we are constantly craving for something that we don't have and we are never fully happy with the present moment. Well, I have found a place where you I so little to be happy for just simple things as beautiful sunrises and sunsets every day, amazing nature and simple food. No endless distractions from phone notifications that allows you to quickly disconnect from outside world, forget about your real life problems and reconnect with nature and your inner self. It has never been so easy to be mindful and so present anywhere else than on an island in San Blas archipelago. I feel blessed that I have had an opportunity to discover this amazing place on earth and to come back here again. Music: Catching Flies - Daymarks https://soundcloud.com/catchingfliesmusic/daymarks Video shot with DJI Mavic Pro http://click.dji.com/AMfS21OdtKBESOpQnOWu?pm=link
https://wn.com/San_Blas_Carribean_Paradise_Islands_In_Panama_I_Dji_Mavic_Pro_Drone_Aerial_Video_Footage_In_2.7K
Panama Canal Construction in 1912 | American Vintage Documentary

Panama Canal Construction in 1912 | American Vintage Documentary

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:29
  • Updated: 20 Mar 2016
  • views: 7152
videos
★ CHECK OUT OUR T-SHIRTS: https://bravestgeneration.com/collections/all ✚ Watch our "Old America" PLAYLIST: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLaGAbbh1M3ImKavW8ZY0aZyFK1c-PLCAj ►Facebook: https://facebook.com/TheBestFilmArchives ►Google+: https://plus.google.com/+TheBestFilmArchives ►Twitter: https://twitter.com/BestFilmArch Vintage documentary on the Panama Canal construction in 1912. Narration describes the construction of and history behind the Panama Canal. Footage primarily of trains, construction machinery and workers. Includes Gatun Dam. About the Canal: The Panama Canal (Spanish: Canal de Panamá) is a 48-mile (77 km) ship canal in Panama that connects the Atlantic Ocean (via the Caribbean Sea) to the Pacific Ocean. The canal cuts across the Isthmus of Panama and is a key conduit for international maritime trade. There are locks at each end to lift ships up to Gatun Lake, an artificial lake created to reduce the amount of excavation work required for the canal, 26 metres (85 ft) above sea level. The current locks are 33.5 metres (110 ft) wide. A third, wider lane of locks is currently under construction and is due to open in April 2016. France began work on the canal in 1881 but stopped due to engineering problems. The United States took over the project in 1904, and opened the canal on August 15, 1914. One of the largest and most difficult engineering projects ever undertaken, the Panama Canal shortcut greatly reduced the time for ships to travel between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, enabling them to avoid the lengthy Cape Horn route around the southernmost tip of South America via the Drake Passage or Strait of Magellan. Colombia, France, and later the United States controlled the territory surrounding the canal during construction. The US continued to control the canal and surrounding Panama Canal Zone until the 1977 Torrijos–Carter Treaties provided for handover to Panama. After a period of joint AmericanPanamanian control, in 1999 the canal was taken over by the Panamanian government, and is now managed and operated by the government-owned Panama Canal Authority. Annual traffic has risen from about 1,000 ships in 1914, when the canal opened, to 14,702 vessels in 2008, the latter measuring a total of 333.7 million tons. By 2012, more than 815,000 vessels had passed through the canal; the largest ships that can transit the canal today are called Panamax. It takes 6 to 8 hours to pass through the Panama Canal. The American Society of Civil Engineers has named the Panama Canal one of the seven wonders of the modern world. About the construction: The construction of a canal with locks required the excavation of more than 170,000,000 cu yd (129,974,326 m3) of material over and above the 30,000,000 cu yd (22,936,646 m3) excavated by the French. As quickly as possible, the Americans replaced or upgraded the old, unusable French equipment with new construction equipment that was designed for a much larger and faster scale of work. About 102 new large, railroad-mounted steam shovels were brought from the United States. These were joined by enormous steam-powered cranes, giant hydraulic rock crushers, cement mixers, dredges, and pneumatic power drills, nearly all of which were manufactured by new, extensive machine-building technology developed and built in the United States. The railroad also had to be comprehensively upgraded with heavy-duty, double-tracked rails over most of the line to accommodate new rolling stock. In many places, the new Gatun Lake flooded over the original rail line, and a new line had to be constructed above Gatun Lake's waterline. The construction of the canal was completed in 1914. The United States spent almost $375,000,000 (roughly equivalent to $8,600,000,000 now) to finish the project. This was by far the largest American engineering project to date. Panama Canal Construction in 1912 | American Vintage Documentary TBFA_0049
https://wn.com/Panama_Canal_Construction_In_1912_|_American_Vintage_Documentary
DNA: Panama paper leaks expose hidden wealth of world's elite- Part II

DNA: Panama paper leaks expose hidden wealth of world's elite- Part II

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  • Duration: 8:32
  • Updated: 04 Apr 2016
  • views: 13393
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The two big draws that offshore entities in jurisdictions such as British Virgin Islands, Bahamas, Seychelles and more specifically Panama, offer are: secrecy of information relating to the ultimate beneficiary owner and zero tax on income generated. Zee News always stay ahead in bringing current affairs from all the valley of National interest, Politics, Entertainment, Sports and International happenings. We take you to the depth of every matter by providing every small detail and makes you familiar with all the happening around you. Zee News is the highly popular Hindi News channel of India’s largest television network ZMCL. The channel, which has a huge following in India and abroad, has won several prestigious national and international awards. Among its popular programs are - Dr. Subhash Chandra Show: https://goo.gl/fCugXC Daily News and Analysis: https://goo.gl/B8eVsD Manthan: https://goo.gl/6q0wUN Fast n Facts: https://goo.gl/kW2MYV Your daily dose of entertainment: https://goo.gl/ZNEfhw Sports roundup: https://goo.gl/KeeYjf Aapke Sitare: https://goo.gl/X56YSa Bharat Bhagya Vidhata: https://goo.gl/QqJiOV Taal Thok Ke : https://goo.gl/yiV6e7 Subscribe to our channel at https://goo.gl/qKzmWg Check out our website: http://www.zeenews.com Connect with us at our social media handles: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ZeeNews Twitter: https://twitter.com/ZeeNews Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/+Zeenews
https://wn.com/Dna_Panama_Paper_Leaks_Expose_Hidden_Wealth_Of_World's_Elite_Part_Ii
Panama Canal and Panama City

Panama Canal and Panama City

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  • Duration: 1:01
  • Updated: 02 Sep 2015
  • views: 23
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The Panama Canal (Spanish: Canal de Panamá) is a 77.1-kilometre (48 mi) ship canal in Panama that connects the Atlantic Ocean (via the Caribbean Sea) to the Pacific Ocean. The canal cuts across the Isthmus of Panama and is a key conduit for international maritime trade. There are locks at each end to lift ships up to Gatun Lake, an artificial lake created to reduce the amount of excavation work required for the canal, 26 metres (85 ft) above sea level. The current locks are 33.5 metres (110 ft) wide. A third, wider lane of locks is currently under construction and is due to open in 2016. France began work on the canal in 1881, but had to stop because of engineering problems and high mortality due to disease. The United States took over the project in 1904, and took a decade to complete the canal, which was officially opened on August 15, 1914. One of the largest and most difficult engineering projects ever undertaken, the Panama Canal shortcut greatly reduced the time for ships to travel between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, enabling them to avoid the lengthy, hazardous Cape Horn route around the southernmost tip of South America via the Drake Passage or Strait of Magellan. The shorter, faster, and safer route to the U.S. West Coast and to nations in and around the Pacific Ocean allowed those places to become more integrated with the world economy. During construction, ownership of the territory that the Panama Canal now passes through was first Colombian, then French, and then American. The US continued to control the canal and surrounding Panama Canal Zone until the 1977 Torrijos–Carter Treaties provided for handover to Panama. After a period of joint American–Panamanian control, the canal was taken over by the Panamanian government in 1999, and is now managed and operated by the Panama Canal Authority, a Panamanian government agency. Annual traffic has risen from about 1,000 ships in 1914, when the canal opened, to 14,702 vessels in 2008, the latter measuring a total of 309.6 million Panama Canal/Universal Measurement System (PC/UMS) tons. By 2008, more than 815,000 vessels had passed through the canal; the largest ships that can transit the canal today are called Panamax.[1] It takes 6 to 8 hours to pass through the Panama Canal. The American Society of Civil Engineers has named the Panama Canal one of the seven wonders of the modern world
https://wn.com/Panama_Canal_And_Panama_City
Panama/Panama Canal (One of the 7 wonders of the modern world)  Part 7

Panama/Panama Canal (One of the 7 wonders of the modern world) Part 7

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  • Duration: 19:42
  • Updated: 29 Mar 2013
  • views: 13592
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Welcome to my travelchannel.On my channel you can find almost 1000 films of more than 70 countries. See the playlist on my youtube channel.Enjoy! https://www.youtube.com/user/nurettinodunya/playlists Panama Canal The Panama Canal (Spanish: Canal de Panamá) is a 48-mile (77.1 km) ship canal in Panama that connects the Atlantic Ocean (via the Caribbean Sea) to the Pacific Ocean. The canal cuts across the Isthmus of Panama and is a key conduit for international maritime trade. There are locks at each end to lift ships up to Gatun Lake (85 feet (26 m) above sea-level). The Gatun Lake was used to reduce the amount of work required for a sea-level connection. The current locks are 110 feet (33.5 m) wide. A third, wider lane of locks is being built. Work on the canal, which began in 1881, was completed in 1914, making it no longer necessary for ships to sail the lengthy Cape Horn route around the southernmost tip of South America (via the Drake Passage) or to navigate the dangerous[citation needed] waters of the Strait of Magellan. One of the largest and most difficult engineering projects ever undertaken, the Panama Canal shortcut made it possible for ships to travel between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans in half the time previously required. The shorter, faster, safer route to the U.S. West Coast and to nations in and along the Pacific Ocean allowed those places to become more integrated with the world economy. During this time, ownership of the territory that is now the Panama Canal was first Colombian, then French, and then American before coming under the control of the Panamanian government in 1999. The Panama Canal has seen annual traffic rise from about 1,000 ships when it opened in 1914, to 14,702 vessels in 2008, the latter measuring a total of 309.6 million Panama Canal/Universal Measurement System (PC/UMS) tons. By 2008, more than 815,000 vessels had passed through the canal, many of them much larger than the original planners could have envisioned; the largest ships that can transit the canal today are called Panamax.The American Society of Civil Engineers has named the Panama Canal one of the seven wonders of the modern world. The Locks Along the route of the canal there is a series of 3 sets of locks, the Gatun, Pedro Miguel and the Miraflores locks. At Gatun there are 2 parallel sets of locks each consisting of 3 flights. This set of locks lift ships a total of 26 metres. The locks are constructed from concrete from which the aggregate originated from the excavated rock at Culebra. The excavated rock was crushed and then used as aggregate. In excess of 1.53 million cubic metres of concrete was used in the construction of the Gatun locks alone. Initially the locks at Gatun had been designed as 28.5 metres wide. In 1908 the United States Navy requested that the locks should be increased to have a width of at least 36 metres. This would allow for the passage of US naval ships. Eventually a compromise was made and the locks were to be constructed to a width of 33 metres. Each lock is 300 metres long with the walls ranging in thickness from 15 metres at the base to 3 metres at the top. The central wall between the parallel locks at Gatun has a thickness of 18 metres and stands in excess of 24 metres in height. The lock gates are made from steel and measures an average of 2 metres thick, 19.5 metres in length and stand 20 metres in height. When Colonel Geothals the American designer of the Panama Canal visited the Kiel Canal in 1912 he was told the canal should have been built 36 metres in width, but by then it was too late. The locks can be seen during construction below. A general picture of the Gatun locks can be seen below. The smallest set of locks along the Panama Canal are at Pedro Miguel and have one flight which raise or lower ships 10 metres. The Miraflores locks have two flights with a combined lift or decent of 16.5 metres.Both the single flight of locks at Pedro Miguel and the twin flights at Miraflores are constructed and operated in a similar method as the Gatun locks, but with differing dimensions. What makes the Panama Canal remarkable is its self sufficiency. The dam at Gatun, is able to generate the electricity to run all the motors which operate the canal as well as the locomotives in charge of towing the ships through the canal. No force is required to adjust the water level between the locks except gravity. As the lock operates, the water simply flows into the locks from the lakes or flows out to the sea level channels. The canal also relies on the overabundant rainfall of the area to compensate for the loss of the 52 million gallons of fresh water consumed during each crossing. Despite the limit in ship size, the canal is still one of the most highly travelled waterways in the world, handling over 12,000 ships per year. The 51-mile crossing takes about nine hours to complete, an immense time saving when compared with rounding the tip of South America.
https://wn.com/Panama_Panama_Canal_(One_Of_The_7_Wonders_Of_The_Modern_World)_Part_7
Panama Canal, Panama - Transit - Bridge of the Americas HD (2014)

Panama Canal, Panama - Transit - Bridge of the Americas HD (2014)

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  • Duration: 1:55
  • Updated: 27 Jul 2014
  • views: 402
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The Panama Canal (Spanish: Canal de Panamá) is a 77.1-kilometre (48 mi) ship canal in Panama that connects the Atlantic Ocean (via the Caribbean Sea) to the Pacific Ocean. The canal cuts across the Isthmus of Panama and is a key conduit for international maritime trade. There are locks at each end to lift ships up to Gatun Lake, an artificial lake created to reduce the amount of excavation work required for the canal, 26 metres (85 ft) above sea level. The current locks are 33.5 metres (110 ft) wide. A third, wider lane of locks is currently under construction and is due to open in 2015. France began work on the canal in 1881, but had to stop because of engineering problems and high mortality due to disease. The United States took over the project in 1904, and took a decade to complete the canal, which was officially opened on August 15, 1914. One of the largest and most difficult engineering projects ever undertaken, the Panama Canal shortcut greatly reduced the time for ships to travel between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, enabling them to avoid the lengthy, hazardous Cape Horn route around the southernmost tip of South America via the Drake Passage or Strait of Magellan. The shorter, faster, and safer route to the U.S. West Coast and to nations in and around the Pacific Ocean allowed those places to become more integrated with the world economy. It takes between 20 and 30 hours to traverse the canal. During construction, ownership of the territory that is now the Panama Canal was first Colombian, then French, and then American. The US continued to control the canal and surrounding Panama Canal Zone until the 1977 Torrijos–Carter Treaties provided for handover to Panama. After a period of joint American–Panamanian control, the canal was taken over by the Panamanian government in 1999, and is now managed and operated by the Panama Canal Authority, a Panamanian government agency. Annual traffic has risen from about 1,000 ships in 1914, when the canal opened, to 14,702 vessels in 2008, the latter measuring a total of 309.6 million Panama Canal/Universal Measurement System (PC/UMS) tons. By 2008, more than 815,000 vessels had passed through the canal; the largest ships that can transit the canal today are called Panamax. The American Society of Civil Engineers has named the Panama Canal one of the seven wonders of the modern world.
https://wn.com/Panama_Canal,_Panama_Transit_Bridge_Of_The_Americas_Hd_(2014)